Press and Go!

I visited a hospital that I haven't accessed for quite a while because I've been based at other sites. To my surprise as I walked onto the premises to be greeted with this as seen here:

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Kiosk

Kiosk for patient information

I was instantly really interested as I hadn't seen this on the hospital site before so started playing around with it.

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A quick look at the screen showed functions that people were looking for at the landing page. When I was a clinician, I had patients come up to me asking for directions and where ED was, so having this front and centre and other things below makes perfect sense. I was very impressed with it, those involved with bringing it to fruition surely must have done their research of user's pain points and have brilliantly created an interface that is functional and does perform what most patients complain about in the hospital. what is most awesome about this interface is that you can enter your mobile phone and have the URL of the map texted to you in real time, so that you don't need to memorise the whole wayfinding experience but actually have it on your phone. I like that this all promotes patient independence and caters for people who don't want to ask people for directions (myself included, I hate awkward encounters). 

This post isn't that interesting, but I am working on a few things on my own which I'd love to share with you all soon. To be honest, I just want to keep continuing working on my UX knowledge...because there is honestly just too much to learn. Given the many high profile suicides that have occurred as of late in the media and beyond and how depression is an illness that is close to my heart, I have decided to embark on a mini UX project on depression. I want to understand how we can connect vulnerable people with services to let them know that they aren't alone, that help is all around... watch this space, I truly hope I can shed some light on it with my UX project!

Till the next time with more interesting UX things in health, Katie.